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Notes and Reflections on Books and Media

by Hannah Leitheiser

creamation

Life on the Mississippi

Twain, Mark

1883

Link

2017-04-01

'I encountered a man in the street, whom I had not seen for six or seven years; and something like this talk followed. I said—

‘But you used to look sad and oldish; you don’t now. Where did you get all this youth and bubbling cheerfulness? Give me the address....’

‘It used to be rough times with me when you knew me—insurance-agency business, you know; mighty irregular. ...

‘Does a coffin pay so well. Is there much profit on a coffin?’

‘Go-way! How you talk!’ Then, with a confidential wink, a dropping of the voice, and an impressive laying of his hand on my arm; ‘Look here; there’s one thing in this world which isn’t ever cheap. That’s a coffin. There’s one thing in this world which a person don’t ever try to jew you down on. That’s a coffin. There’s one thing in this world which a person don’t say—“I’ll look around a little, and if I find I can’t do better I’ll come back and take it.” That’s a coffin. There’s one thing in this world which a person won’t take in pine if he can go walnut; and won’t take in walnut if he can go mahogany; and won’t take in mahogany if he can go an iron casket with silver door-plate and bronze handles. That’s a coffin. And there’s one thing in this world which you don’t have to worry around after a person to get him to pay for. And that’s a coffin. Undertaking?—why it’s the dead-surest business in Christendom, and the nobbiest.

As for me, I hope to be cremated.' - Mark Twain

'[Mark Twain] is buried in his wife's family plot' - Wikipedia

Denied.